News News
Contact us
  • Customer service number:64321087
  • Commercial service telephone:13918059423
  • Technical service telephone:13918059423
  • Contact person: Mr. Cui 
  • Service email:shxtb@163.com
  • Address: room 107, building 8, no. 100, guilin road, xuhui district, Shanghai

Ancient ocean floors could help in the search for critical minerals

The date of: 2022-06-09
viewed: 1

source:sciencedaily


Studying ancient ocean floors could help discover minerals needed to produce electric cars and solar panels.

Researchers at The University of Queensland led a collaborative study that examined the remnants of ocean floors in eastern Australia and central Asia and applied a method to date the age of calcite trapped inside.

Dr Renjie Zhou from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences said the findings could make it easier to source critical minerals used in renewable and clean technologies.

'Calcite and other hydrothermal minerals are often observed in critical mineral deposits and form under mineralising fluid activities,' Dr Zhou said.

'Our work shows that we can trace the history of fluids in the Earth's crust and see when and what mineral resources they might generate.'

The renewable energy sector is continuing to grow rapidly with increasing demand for technologies like wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles and batteries.

'These often require large quantities of critical minerals,' he said.

'Electric vehicles need up to four times more copper than conventional cars and a single wind turbine uses several tonnes of permanent magnets made of rare earth metals.'

Dr Zhou said being able to study and discover these minerals was going to become increasingly important.

'Researchers across many institutions are doing excellent work in this field, including UQ's Centre for Geoanalytical Mass Spectrometry,' Dr Zhou said.

'Our hope is to expand our collaboration with industry and academia to increase the understanding and discovery of critical minerals in the future.'



Hot News / Related to recommend
  • 2023 - 01 - 19
    Click on the number of times: 1
    Deep seabed mining plans pit renewable energy demand against ocean life in a largely unexplored frontier source:themandarinAs companies race to expand renewable energy and the batteries to store ...
  • 2023 - 01 - 18
    Click on the number of times: 2
    source:natureHafnium isn’t a particularly remarkable element. It’s not your explosive sodium, shimmering mercury or stinky sulfur. It’s a greyish metal and is commonly used as a neutron absorber in th...
  • 2023 - 01 - 17
    Click on the number of times: 1
    source:mydrollIt’s “lights out” for antibiotic-resistant superbugs as next-generation light-activated nanotech proves it can eradicate some of the most notorious and potentially deadly bacteria in the...
  • 2023 - 01 - 16
    Click on the number of times: 1
    source:lva.lenovoBasalt is a type of volcanic rock that is formed when lava with a high content of mafic minerals (such as pyroxene and olivine) cools and solidifies. Basalt lava eruptions occur when ...
  • Copyright ©Copyright 2018 2020 Shanghai rare earth association All Rights Reserved Shanghai ICP NO.2020034223
    the host:Shanghai Association of Rare Earth the guide:Shanghai Development and Application Office of Rare Earth the organizer:Shanghai rare earth industry promotion center
    犀牛云提供云计算服务